The object of this page is to share information with like minded people, I hope it proves helpful.

 

(All articles not written by me have been credited to the respective authors.)

 

 

Boxer Heart Warning
ACEPROMAZINE (ACP) WARNING
Wendy Wallner, DVM

There is one drug used in anaesthetic protocols that should not be used in the boxer. That drug is Acepromazine, a tranquilliser that is often used as a preanesthetic agent. In the boxer it tends to cause a problem called first degree heart block, a potentially serious arrhythmia of the heart. It also causes a profound hypotension (severe lowering of the blood pressure) in many boxers that are given the drug.

 

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Raw Feeding
Sally Young

My first introduction to Raw Feeding came in 2006 when, after trying many different kibble products on a female of mine who was showing alarming signs of allergic reactions that I could not get under control; my friend Monique Hodgkinson of Tanyati Boxers, suggested I try it out. She had been using if for some months by then, and highly recommended it.

 

I was quite desperate by this time, as my female was getting worse and ended up with a really nasty wet eczema around her neck.

 

I immediately put her onto a raw diet, and within 2 weeks the eczema had almost disappeared. That did it for me; I was sold, and have not looked back since.

 

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Official Breed Standard of The Kennel Union of Southern Africa Courtesy SABOX website www.saboxer.co.za

BOXER
For the full Standard visit www.saboxer.co.za


BRIEF HISTORICAL SUMMARY: The small, so called Brabant Bullenbeisser is regarded as the immediate ancestor of the Boxer. In the past, the breeding of these Bullenbeissers was in the hands of the huntsmen, whom they assisted during the chase. Their task was to seize the game put up by chasing hounds and hold it firmly until the huntsman arrived and put an end to the prey. For this job the dog had to have as wide jaws as possible with broadly spaced teeth, in order to bite firmly and hold on tightly. A Bullenbeisser which had these characteristics was best suited to this job and was used for breeding. Previously only the ability to work and utilization were considered. Selective breeding was carried out which produced a dog with a wide muzzle and an upturned nose

 

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Boxer Heart Warning
Article written by Wendy Wallner, DVM


ACEPROMAZINE (ACP) WARNING


There is one drug used in anaesthetic protocols that should not be used in the boxer. That drug is Acepromazine, a tranquilliser that is often used as a preanesthetic agent. In the boxer it tends to cause a problem called first degree heart block, a potentially serious arrhythmia of the heart. It also causes a profound hypotension (severe lowering of the blood pressure) in many boxers that are given the drug.


Recently on the Veterinary Information Network, a computer network for practicing veterinarians, an announcement was placed in the cardiology section entitled "Acepromazine and Boxers." This described several adverse reactions to the drug in a very short time span at a Veterinary Teaching Hospital. All the adverse reactions were in boxers. The reactions included collapse, respiratory arrest and profound bradycardia (slow heart rate, less than 60 beats per minute). The announcement suggested that acepromazine should not be used in dogs of the boxer breed because of breed related sensitivity to the drug.

 

WARNING:
This drug is the most commonly prescribed tranquillizer in veterinary medicine. It is also used orally and is prescribed for owners who want to tranquillise their dogs for air travel. I would strongly recommend that boxer owners avoid the use of this drug, especially when the dog will be unattended and/or unable to receive emergency medical care if it is needed.

 

Raw Feeding

 

My first introduction to Raw Feeding came in 2006 when, after trying many different kibble products on a female of mine who was showing alarming signs of allergic reactions that I could not get under control; my friend Monique Hodgkinson of Tanyati Boxers, suggested I try it out. She had been using if for some months by then, and highly recommended it.

 

I was quite desperate by this time, as my female was getting worse and ended up with a really nasty wet eczema around her neck.

 

I immediately put her onto a raw diet, and within 2 weeks the eczema had almost disappeared. That did it for me; I was sold, and have not looked back since. I then moved all my dogs onto it, and my old boy Tigger, who had Mast Cell Cancer, had a wonderful new lease of life, as he trimmed down to a more healthy and appropriate weight through the diet. I keep all my females on the raw diet throughout their pregnancies and raise all my puppies on it too.

 

I feed raw meaty bones/whole carcasses – mostly chicken as that is what is readily available to me. This is mixed with a small variety of vegetables. I also include green tripe, lungs, hearts, liver, kidneys, chicken necks, heads & feet, as part of their diet. Eggs in their shells, pigs trotters and also whole fish every now and then.


Green tripe is by the far the most popular meal with my dogs, what makes green tripe so good? Firstly, tripe has a calcium-phosphorus ratio of 1:1, which is great for dogs. It has a relatively low fat content, along with good amounts of essential fatty acids. Potassium, vitamins, magnesium. And beyond the chemical compositions of tripe, the food contains good amounts of lactobacillus acidophilus which we know as a pro-biotic and this helps the digestion.


The other reason I am pro the feeding of tripe, and it is certainly not it’s smell!! Is that it’s other benefits are the over-all health improvement, reduced skin problems, shinier coats, better teeth, stronger muscles, better digestion. I recently had a youngster that I bred come to stay with me over Christmas, he is a real fussy eater, and because he doesn’t have a doggy companion at home at the moment, he has no competition for food, and this is just making the situation worse. Well, he went wild when I fed him tripe, not only did he remain at his bowl, till every last piece was finished, but he went to everyone else’s bowl. So, if you have fussy eaters give it a try.


Depending on which country you live in will be depend on how easily you can obtain certain meat. However you will find there are many suggested ways and many suppliers to help you on how to prepare a diet that suits you and your dogs.

 

There are many websites on Raw feeding; I have listed a few below.

 

www.rawlearning.com
www.totallyrawdogfood.com
www.barfaustralia.com

 

Official Breed Standard of The Kennel Union of Southern Africa
Courtesy SABOX website www.saboxer.co.za

 

BOXER
For the full Standard visit www.saboxer.co.za


BRIEF HISTORICAL SUMMARY: The small, so called Brabant Bullenbeisser is regarded as the immediate ancestor of the Boxer. In the past, the breeding of these Bullenbeissers was in the hands of the huntsmen, whom they assisted during the chase. Their task was to seize the game put up by chasing hounds and hold it firmly until the huntsman arrived and put an end to the prey. For this job the dog had to have as wide jaws as possible with broadly spaced teeth, in order to bite firmly and hold on tightly. A Bullenbeisser which had these characteristics was best suited to this job and was used for breeding. Previously only the ability to work and utilization were considered. Selective breeding was carried out which produced a dog with a wide muzzle and an upturned nose.


GENERAL APPEARANCE: The Boxer is a medium sized, smooth coated, sturdy dog of compact square build and strong bone. His muscles are taut, strongly developed and moulded in appearance. His movement is lively, powerful with noble bearing. The Boxer must be neither cumbersome or heavy, nor light or lacking in body substance.

 

IMPORTANT PROPORTIONS:
a) Length of body / Height at withers : Square build, which means that the horizontal line of the back is perpendicular to the vertical line passing through the point of shoulder and to the other vertical line passing through the point of buttock, thus defining a square outline.


b) Depth of brisket / Height at withers: The chest reaches to the elbows. Depth of chest is half the height at withers.


c) Length of nose bridge / Length of head: Length of nose bridge in relation to skull should be 1 : 2 (measured from tip of nose to inner corner of eye or, respectively, inner corner of eye to occiput).

 

Size and Weight
Height at the withers: Dogs 57-63cm
Females 53-59cm
Weight Dogs approx 30kg when at 60cm at withers
Females approx 25kg when at 56cm at withers

 

 

BEHAVIOUR / TEMPERAMENT: The Boxer should be fearless self-confident, calm and equable. Temperament is of the utmost importance and requires careful attention. Devotion and loyalty towards his master and his entire household, his watchfulness and self-assured courage as a defender are famous. He is harmless with his family but distrustful of strangers. Happy and friendly in play, yet fearless in a serious situation. Easy to train on account of his willingness to obey, his pluck and courage, natural keenness and scent capability. Undemanding and clean, he is just as agreeable and appreciated in the family circle as he is as a guard, companion and working dog. His character is trustworthy, with no guile or cunning, even in old age.

 

HEAD: This gives the Boxer his characteristic look. Must be in good proportion to the body and appear neither too light nor too heavy. Muzzle should be as broad and powerful as possible. The harmony of the head depends on the balance between muzzle and skull. From whichever direction the head is viewed, from front above or sideways, the muzzle must always be in the right proportion to the skull i.e. it must never appear too small. It should be clean, not showing any wrinkle. However natural folds are formed in the cranial region when alerted. From root of nose, folds are always indicated running in a downward direction on both sides. The dark mask is confined to the muzzle and must be in sharp contrast to the colour of the head so that the face does not appear sombre.